Workers' Compensation

What Does it Mean to Settle on the Rating?

What Does it Mean to Settle on the Rating?

This is an excellent question that I often hear from clients who were injured at work: “What does it mean to settle on the rating?” In order to understand what this means it’s important to first know what a rating is. Ratings are given to physical injuries to describe how much or little ability you’ve lost in your injured body part.

For instance, if you sustained a shoulder injury, your doctor may give you a 5% rating. This means that your shoulder is working at 95% of its original capacity. In other words, you’ve lost 5% of your original mobility in that shoulder. Typically, your rating will be assigned by your physician at the end of treatment.

So how does that rating affect your settlement? Your rating is equal to a particular dollar amount that you are owed. There is a specific calculation for determining this amount. Each body part is assigned a number of weeks. Then, they multiply that number by the rating percentage and workers’ compensation rate.

Let’s say you have injured your back and received a 10% rating. A back injury is worth 300 weeks. If your workers’ compensation rate is $300, you’d multiply 10% x 300 x 300. So if you settled on the rating, your settlement would be $9,000.

It’s always a good idea to speak with an attorney who is experienced in workers’ compensation to help you navigate terms such as this. It can take a huge headache out of trying to figure out what you need to know for your case. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact an experienced attorney.

To “settle on rating” means that you will receive a sum of money determined by the degree of your injury and where you were injured. If you’ve been injured at work, contact an experienced attorney to find out if this is relevant to your case.

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