Category: Social Security Disability

What’s the Difference between Social Security Insurance and Social Security Disability?

Social Security Disability

What’s the Difference between Social Security Insurance and Social Security Disability?
When just given the name, Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance sound very similar, especially when they’re referred to by their abbreviations: SSI and SSDI. However, they are very different, and have very different requirements for who can qualify.

 

SSI refers to Supplemental Security Income. SSI is designed to support those in financial need. Whether or not you qualify has nothing to do with your work history. The only thing that’s taken into consideration is your income and financial situation. In order to receive SSI benefits, you must have less than $2,000 in assets. If you are married, you must have less than $3,000. Unlike SSDI, SSI is funded by general taxes rather than the Social Security trust fund.

 

On the other hand, Social Security Disability has to do with your employment status. Because funds are drawn from payroll taxes, your eligibility has to do with how long you’ve been employed and paying into Social Security. In order to receive these benefits, you must be younger than 65. You must also have earned a certain number of work credits. These work credits are determined by your annual income.

 

If you qualify for either SSI or SSDI, be sure to contact an experienced attorney. We can help guide you through the process of applying for these benefits and make sure that you doing what best fits your situation.

 

Whether you qualify for SSI or SSDI, make sure that your rights are being protected and that you are receiving the benefits you deserve. Give us a call for a free consultation.

What Evidence Do I Need for My Social Security Case?

Social Security Disability

What Evidence Do I Need for My Social Security Case?

When it comes to putting together a social security disability case, it all comes down to your ability to prove your medical condition. A strong social security disability case requires three things:

  • Timely medical records
  • Accurate medical records
  • Sufficient medical records

When looking at a social security case, timely records means that your records need to be up-to-date with your condition. For instance, if you have a rapidly changing condition, you’re going to need more recent records than someone who has a more stable condition.

 

In order to prove the accuracy of your records you must show evidence for your claims. For instance, if you report a bone fracture, your x-rays must show where the bone is broken. If your doctor reports that you are unable to stand for a period of 30 minutes, but you can indeed stand for that long, those reports will not be considered accurate. (Remember that the records must also come from a medical professional.)

 

Finally, you must provide sufficient records. This means that the Social Security Administration needs your medical reports to be thorough. It’s not enough to state your condition. Your records need to detail things such as where your injury is located, how your doctor came to their diagnosis (e.g. what tests did they run?), and what treatments you’ve received.

 

Having all of this information can make a huge difference in your case and whether the Social Security Administration will consider you compensable or not.

 

Building a strong case starts with timely, accurate and sufficient medical records. Start working with an experienced attorney early on in your Social Security Disability claim so that they can help you build a strong case from day one. Be sure to give us a call for a free consultation.

Can I Earn Social Security Benefits and Veterans’ Disability Benefits?

Can I Earn Social Security Benefits and Veterans’ Disability Benefits?

I frequently speak with veterans who express concern about their ability to earn both Social Security disability benefits and veterans’ disability benefits. The good news is that you can earn both at the same time. In fact, in some cases VA disability benefits can help you earn Social Security benefits.


If you’re receiving veterans’ disability, then Social Security is going to strongly take that into consideration. In their eyes, another government agency has already declared your injury legitimate and decided that you are in need of benefits. Unfortunately, this doesn’t really work the other way. If you’re already receiving Social Security benefits, the VA isn’t necessarily going to take that into consideration because there’s no way of knowing if your Social Security benefits are service-related.

There are a few differences between Social Security and VA disability. For instance, in order to receive Social Security benefits, you must be completely disabled — whereas with VA disability, you can have a low disability rating (sometimes as low as 10%).

Another big difference is the amount of weight your physician’s word has. With Social Security disability, your designated treating physician’s word is the final say. Your case can rely entirely on what your doctor says. However, with veterans’ disability, the VA considers all factors. Their policy says that your doctor could be biased, so they must look at any and all contributing factors.

It’s important that you’re receiving all of the benefits that you need. Working with an experienced attorney is an excellent way to make sure that you’re getting everything you deserve. Be sure to give us a call for a free consultation.

How Does Drug Addiction Affect Social Security?

How Does Drug Addiction Affect Social Security?

It is important to know that social security benefits do not cover drug addiction. If you are seeking social security benefits because of a drug addiction, you will be denied. However, if you are — or were in the past — addicted to drugs, you can still receive benefits. Below are some things you’ll want to keep in mind should you decide to apply for social security benefits while also having a diagnosed drug addiction.

When you file your social security claim, you’ll need to make sure you meet the following requirements:

  1. You must make a working salary of less than $1,170 a month.
  2. Your condition must be long term (expecting to last at least a year).
  3. Your condition must be damaging your ability to work.

Applying for Social Security if You’ve Had Past Drug Use

If you’ve suffered from permanent changes to your physical or mental health due to a past drug addiction, you can qualify for social security benefits. Your condition will have to meet certain criteria depending on how it affects you. It’s best to speak with an attorney directly to discuss your specific case.

Applying for Social Security with a Current Drug Addiction

While you can’t receive social security benefits for your drug addiction, it’s still possible to receive benefits for a different condition while also dealing with a drug addiction. However, if the Social Security Administration determines that your condition would go away if you were to stop using drugs, your claim will be denied.

Do You Need Medical Evidence?

If you’re claiming social security benefits due to a condition caused by past drug use, you’ll need to provide medical evidence through psychiatric reports, names and addresses of your doctors, and a full history of your medical records (including hospitalizations and medications).

If you have additional questions about claiming benefits while dealing with a current or past drug addiction, be sure to speak with an experienced attorney. We can help you determine whether or not your case is likely to qualify and help guide you through the process.

Applying for social security benefits? Don’t go it alone. Speak with an experienced attorney to help guide you through the process. Give us a call — at Oxner + Permar we offer a free consultation.

Getting Social Security Benefits for Mental Disabilities

Getting Social Security Benefits for Mental Disabilities

Struggling with a mental illness is a serious issue. If you’re someone living with a mental illness such as depression, OCD, anxiety disorder or bipolar disorder, then you know it can be a huge strain on your job as well as your personal life. Mental illnesses are often just as serious as physical ones. Fortunately, if you suffer from a debilitating mental illness that makes it difficult to perform your job, you can apply for social security benefits.

 

However, many people run into a significant challenge: It can be much more difficult to prove to a court the effects of a mental illness as opposed to a physical one. Today I want to share a few tips to keep in mind when applying for social security:

 

  1. Show a History of Treatment
    Proving to the court that you have a history of coping with your mental illness is a good way to demonstrate not only the effects of the illness, but also your desire to get better. This will help your case tremendously.
  2. Receive a Diagnosis from a Psychiatrist or Psychologist
    With any disability, the court wants to see that you’ve have sought an expert opinion. A psychiatrist or psychologist will have the training and expertise to give the court a solid basis on which to form their decision.
  3. See a Doctor Before You File for Disability
    In order to be approved, not only will you need a diagnosis, but it will need to be a recent one. Remember that in the State of North Carolina, you’ll need to have seen a doctor within in the 90 days before you file.
  4. Take All of Your Prescribed Medicines
    Not only does taking your medicine show your interest in improving your condition, it also allows the court to accurately assess your mental health. They want to be able to evaluate your mental state while receiving treatment.
  5. Provide School Records If Filing for Long Term Disability
    If possible, it’s recommended that you submit your school records while filing for long term disability. This will allow the court to get a more complete view of your mental history. For instance, they’ll be able to assess previous testing you took, as well as show difficulties you may have struggled with in the past.

 

As with any case, the best thing you can do is to follow the advice of your attorney. They will be able to instruct you on what you need to submit and what you need to do before filing. At Oxner + Permar, we provide free, 30-minute consultations, so If you have any questions don’t hesitate to contact us.

 

Did you know that social security benefits cover mental illness? If you have any questions about how to apply for these benefits, be sure to contact an experienced attorney.

Logo Image
Logo Image
Logo Image
Logo Image
Logo Image
Logo Image
Logo Image
Logo Image
Logo Image
{"slides_column":"4","slides_scroll":"1","dots":"true","arrows":"true","autoplay":"true","autoplay_interval":"2000","loop":"true","rtl":"false","speed":"1000","center_mode":"false"}